Stories and thoughts from the past

Being 30 is the new 20. Who the hell came up with that? I don’t know. What the hell does it mean? It can mean different things, but there’s no right answer and finding that single right answer isn’t the way to go about it. The way to do it is to know what this means to you.

Yes, I am turning 30 this year. As my birthday approaches, I’ve been spending a lot of time evaluating what I’ve done the last 10 years, starting from my last years in college, to the career path I have chosen, the relationships I have formed, the places I’ve traveled, and the stories I have heard and remember today.

One particular thing I am especially grateful for is the opportunity I had to travel around the world in my early twenties. I traveled a bit for school, a lot for fun, and some more for work.

My travels allowed me to hear stories from people of different backgrounds and experiences outside of America. Lately, I have been trying to figure out some difficult decisions I need to make in my life around my career. Throughout this process, a story I remember hearing from the past sprouted up. The actual details are simplified, but the essence of the story is still here.

My friend told me of a story about his uncle when he lived in Vietnam. The uncle was poor and had very little cash to try and start any kind of reasonable business. His lack of capital made it hard to improve his family’s economic situation. One day, he found a rice factory that sold bags of rice on consignment for 30 days. Each bag sold for $30, but in the retail market the rice could only sell for $25 max because of stiff competition (the consignment option may have had something to do with this), but nonetheless it is easy to sell because rice is a common staple among the Vietnamese. He decides to pick up 100 bags, which gives him a debt of $3000.

As expected, he sold all 100 bags in one week at $25 a bag. He now has $2500 in cash but $3000 in debt. However, he decides to buy dry fish that sells for $10 a piece from the distributor, but can retail for $15. This distributor does not offer a consignment option. Dry fish is a popular item to eat with rice as well as for a snack. He takes all $2500 and buys fish at $10/piece. Within two weeks he sells all the fish for $15/piece. Now he has  $3750 in cash, and still one week to spare before he has to pay back the debt on the rice he bought at the beginning of the consignment period. He pays back the $3000 and now has $750 in cash, debt-free. He now takes that $750 to buy other wholesale items that he knows will retail for more on the market.

This story is simple, but yet very powerful. There are many themes to take from this story. The beauty of it is that this story has many key elements that serve as good lessons in life. Some elements that stood out to me are:

  1. The power of knowledge
  2. The power of time
  3. The power of cash flow management

Now, for me, the elements most useful are #2 and #3 (although all three work together hand in hand). These two elements are helping me solve a problem that I am currently struggling with in my life. But as I took these elements into careful consideration, the answer started to jump out at me. The reason is because this story made me change the way I think. I remember school taught me to stay conservative and not take big risks like the uncle did in this story. But what one must think of is, what does a person stand to lose if he or she doesn’t take the same kind of action that this uncle did with the rice?

It’s something to think about and really spend time pondering. Remember, these types of stories don’t need to make sense now – in some shape or form it will make much more sense in the future.

Being 30 is the 20 – to me, this means that life is still and always will be an adventure. It doesn’t end when we finish college and start our career. Life can still have much meaning and satisfaction if we make decisions that gravitate towards that.

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